With Monuments As With Men, Position Is Everything

First day of our Scotland tour, you may recall from an earlier photoblog post we climbed up to the Wallace Monument, then climbed up its ever skinnier turret steps to reach the top spire. Last day of Scotland, here we are at Stirling Castle, looking across at the very same monument, and really see how well it was positioned when it first opened in the mid 1800’s.  The houses in the village below looks like little toys, the green mountains behind the perfect backdrop.  So then, I say again, Scotland is lovely and polite and has wrangled its tragic history into a stunning and diverse geographic landscape.  4 weeks wouldn’t be enough to take it all in, so I got the Cliff Notes version. Better than nothing.

The Higher The Building, The Lower The Morals

The Wallace Monument is a glorious 1869 architecture piece perched atop Abbey Craig near Stirling, Scotland, commemorating the life of one William Wallace, he of the blue faced Mel Gibson Braveheart war cries that represent such a fictionalization of what actually happened that our historian bus driver Dave represents the conflicted national pride the locals have of that movie: great for tourism and we love our Will; bummer Mel painted an elaborate deception that confuses the world about what really happened.  But hey, it’s the movies!

In the net, it’s a gorgeous monument that works my wide shoulders and legs as I skinny up the turret to the open spire up top, with gorgeous pastoral views to the surrounding area. Who built this crazy stuff anyhow?  Why is everyone sweating and breathing like snuffly hogs within the echoey sandstone?